Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Catching hold of the Shadow

“I have prayed for years for one good humiliation a day, and then, I must watch my reaction to it. I have no other way of spotting both my denied shadow self and my idealized persona.” ― Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life No more to read even if it says Read more!

Friday, August 21, 2015

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Sunday, April 12, 2015

Why Jesus and Joseph Campbell would love the Book of Mormon.

I finally saw the “Book of Mormon” last night. I knew it would be irreverent but I was still shocked by the provocations offered by creators Trey Parker, Matt Stone (of South Park fame), and Robert Lopez. One miracle of this show is how it blends terrific singing and dancing with ruthless themes. The musical comedy performances delight while the satire cuts deep. Underneath the scatological humor are questions like: How angry are you at God --really? Are you willing to let that anger out? Isn’t it more honest to be angry than to be falsely pious? Don’t you see how piety cuts you off from your true self? And, don’t you see how all religious beliefs are really metaphors?

I can understand why audience members walk out on this show. It offers a brutal ridicule of religious values and propriety in the same way that Jesus offended the pious of his own time. That’s why they killed him.

I think Joseph Campbell would love this show because our culture is struggling to find a new guiding myth. The old literal religions don’t work for many of us. Parker, Stone and Lopez are doing their part to puncture through our cultural conditioning and make room for a new story that can guide us. The show is joyful but the destruction of beliefs carries some pain. Is that why our group was so exhausted after the show?
 © 2015 Laura Lewis-Barr all rights reserved No more to read on this post. Even though Blogger says Read more!

Sunday, June 22, 2014

A (very) brief history of Quakers



I've been attending a Quaker Meeting in my area..  I'm always impressed by the leadership and creativity of Quakers that I meet.    Is this because some Meetings don't have formal leadership and group members need to step into their own leadership and creativity?  I'm hoping more people discover that Quaker worship actually fits our contemporary world very well.  Their hour of silent worship has similarities to Buddhist meditation and mindfulness.  I've read that Carl Jung thought highly of Quakerism.  There are many ways that this religion aligns well with Jungian principles.
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Friday, January 31, 2014

Love this story from Jung about his talk with Pueblo Indians


An Indian explained Sun worship and how the ceremonial dances helped the entire world.

Jung:

I then realized on what the “dignity,” the tranquil composure of the individual Indian, was founded. It springs from his being a son of the sun; his life is cosmologically meaningful, for he helps the father and preserver of all life in his daily rise and descent. If we set against this our own self-justifications, the meaning of our own lives as it is formulated by our reason, we cannot help but see our poverty. Out of sheer envy we are obliged to smile at the Indians’ naiveté and to plume ourselves on our cleverness; for otherwise we would discover how impoverished and down at the heels we are. Knowledge does not enrich us; it removes us more and more from the mythic world in which we were once at home by right of birth.

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Thursday, December 26, 2013

Where do we find God?



Watched a wonderful Nova program on PBS last night.   Scientists explained how the great Gothic cathedrals were designed and built.
The program proved more than fascinating.  The scientists helped me understand the effect these massive, light-filled structures had on medieval townspeople.  Instead of the familiar dark, dank stone structure of the period, they entered a miraculous building designed to evoke awe (Jung’s “the numinous”).  From the celestially high walls, to the exquisite mosaic glass, to the intricate floor tiles and carved statues, the Gothic churches tried to create a “heaven on earth.” (Even modern visitors can’t help but be touched by these structures, labored over for decades by local artisans who poured their hearts and souls into each detail.  Did their religious belief compel such exquisite creations?) 

Watching the program, I envied those parishioners who could not help but be moved by the powerful ritual elements.  The attendee not only gazed in wonder but smelled the incense, tasted the Host, and listened to strange chants (the Latin Mass) and angelic choirs. 

Contemplating these gravity defying Gothic miracles, I felt the power and relevance of the Roman Catholic Church in the Middle Ages.  But our world is so different and the church’s rituals are the same!  Is it surprising that so many of us remain unmoved by rituals that have not evolved? 

What do we have in our own age that brings forth the numinous?  What brings us to God?  Movies?  Sports?  The drive to consume and obtain more?   Joseph Campbell was right:  we are living today without a shared mythology or a culturally relevant vehicle for seeking God.  If we had a potent myth, what selfless work could we achieve for the “Glory of God?” 

© 2013 Laura Lewis-Barr all rights reserved No more to read on this post. Even though Blogger says Read more!

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Modern Day Alchemy

Lasagna cooking in oven.
The mystery of ingredients cooking into something new.
My soul too.











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Wednesday, December 11, 2013

A online discussion/workshop on Edinger's Ego and Archetype-- Feb 2014

A fascinating book.  Here's info on the upcoming discussion group.

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Monday, December 2, 2013

Christmas Lights

Struggling to untangle Christmas lights I am struck by the metaphor --my labor to untangle the family trauma.  Both seem impossible.   Sitting in the twisted mess I'm tempted to take the scissors and cut the lights off the garland.  Instead of this glacial, confusing unending task.  It is an uncanny symbol  for my holiday temptation -- to cut away the knots that squeeze out joy. 

But I don't want to be wasteful (or do something I'd regret) so I pull and turn and untangle.  I'm separating the garland from the lights, the only way to get to the root of the problem.  But finally, after much time, I come to a tangle too challenging.  I move the lights away and cut the garland.  Or so I think.  The cord was there and now the lights are unusable.  Is this happening with my family now too?  Are we too late to save?  Are there too many jumbled wounds? 

Despite my best intentions, the cord is cut.  Or perhaps the cord needs to be cut so I can get on with my life and the community I seek.  © 2013 all rights reserved.   No more to read on this post. Even though Blogger says Read more!

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

A trickster story from West Africa...




I love the possible lessons from this story.

On the first day of the week, the trickster God Eshu walked down a country road wearing a strange hat -- red on one side and  white on the other.  He walked between two friendly neighbors who were plowing their fields.   

At lunch the neighbors talked about the stranger who passed their farms. 

"What a fine white hat that man wore."

"White?  No my friend, the sun must have been in your eyes.  It was a brilliant red."

"Are you calling me a liar? It was white as the milk from my cows."

"Do you think I’m an idiot?  It was red as the blood I will draw from your nose!"

"White!"

"Red!"

"White!"

"Red!"

Their argument soon escalated into a vicious brawl.  The neighbors gathered to try to stop them but both men screamed, insisting each was right and the other wrong.

Finally, Eshu the trickster returned.  He chastised them and showed them his hat.  How sad to lose their friendship in defense of the color of a hat! 


© 2013 Laura Lewis-Barr all rights reserved No more to read on this post. Even though Blogger says Read more!

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

You are invited

Embodied Myth:  Exploring  “The Girl Without Hands” Experiential Workshop

Saturday, February 23
1-4 p.m. at the Burning Bush Gallery
216 North Main Street, Wheaton IL
630-668-3100


Embodied Myth is a group process that uses world literature to explore our inner landscape.  Through this process we gain a greater understanding of what is moving in us -- under the surface of life.   Using the myth as a tool, a guide, and a safe structure, we reconnect with unrecognized parts of ourselves.   We also encounter the healing wisdom hidden in myths and fairy tales.  This month’s story: “The Girl Without Hands” by the Brothers Grimm.
Using storytelling, meditation, role-playing, and discussion, we “enter” the story and explore its deepest meanings.   Within the storytelling circle, we encounter not only the ancient story, but our own inner hero, villain, and quest.  No experience is necessary.  Just bring your curiosity.  

Laura was a graduate student in clinical psychology but she eventually switched majors and earned her M.A in theatre.  She is an award winning playwright, theatre director, and teacher. 
$15 per person.  For more information or to register,
contact Tony Asta at tonyasta@ameritech.net or 708-705-8669.
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Sunday, October 14, 2012

Event in Wheaton, IL. You're invited.

 
 
Saturday, November 3
9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. at the Burning Bush Gallery
 
 
Embodied Myth is a depth group process that uses world literature to explore our inner world and our connection to the world around us.Through Embodied Myth, we gain a greater understanding of what is moving in us--under the surface of life.   Using the myth as a tool, a guide, and a safe structure we reconnect with unrecognized parts of ourselves.   We also encounter the healing wisdom hidden in myths and fairytales.
 
            The German fairy tale The Three Languages explores the hero’s journey, our connection to animals, and our own instincts. Using storytelling, meditation, role-playing, and discussion, we enter the story on a deep and personal level, and at the same time realize our connection to another time and place. Come join us in a storytelling circle.  We’ll explore our own mythic journeys and meet archetypes within the story and within ourselves. 
 
            Laura Lewis-Barr is an award winning playwright, theatre director, and teacher. Before getting her MA in Drama, Laura pursued a Masters in Psychology. She was the Artistic Director/Professor of Theatre at Sauk Valley College in Dixon, and Artistic Director of Inspirare Theatre in Glen Ellyn.  During the day, Laura combines her love of theatre, psychology, and education in her work as a corporate trainer (training4breakthroughs.com).  
 
$10 per person, please register by October 27
 
For more information or to register,
contact Tony Asta at tonyasta@ameritech.net or 708-705-8669.
 
 
 
216 North Main Street, Wheaton IL
630-668-3100
 

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Thursday, September 13, 2012

The hardest part of having a vision is seeing what others don't see.

The film is almost complete!

The hardest part of having a vision is seeing what others don't see. Don't despair when they say it can't be done.  Work hard, wait, imagine.
© 2012 Laura Lewis-Barr all rights reserved No more to read on this post. Even though Blogger says


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Sunday, August 12, 2012

Have you seen our movie clip yet?

Click link below to watch our clip.   Help spread the word, donate $1? We'd love your support!
Our movie dream



"Steve, Brian, and I, "on set."
 
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Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Tweet to savor

Tweet from this morning

Been struggling w/ hurt/anger but ths morning, released.  Feeling love for all . Bliss! Compassion is it's own reward.  Answers 2 prayer. 

I'll try to remember this!  Compassion isn't just great for other people, it's a blissful state to live in.  A goal for life.

© 2011 Laura Lewis-Barr all rights reserved No more to read on this post. Even though Blogger says Read more!

Friday, June 29, 2012

Embodied Myth: Exploring “The Three Languages”


Join us this Sunday at the Life Force Arts Center!    More info.

Embodied Myth:  Exploring “The Three Languages”
Embodied Myth is a depth group process that uses the great body of world literature to gain a better understanding of ourselves and our connection to the world around us.  Through Embodied Myth, we gain a greater understanding of what is going on under the surface of life, using the myth as a tool, a guide, and a safe structure. We reconnect with unrecognized parts of ourselves, the archetypal forces tugging inside and outside us. We also encounter the healing wisdom hidden in myths and fairytales. The archetypal themes in these old stories hold true across cultures and time.

The German fairy tale The Three Languages explores the hero’s journey, our connection to animals, and our own instincts. Using storytelling, meditation, role-playing, and discussion, we enter the story on a deep and personal level, and at the same time realize our connection to another time and place. Come join us in a storytelling circle.  We’ll explore our own mythic journeys and meet archetypes within the story and within ourselves.  No acting experience necessary, participants can choose to act or be part of the audience. 
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Wednesday, August 24, 2011

"Wherever a story comes from, whether it is a familiar myth or a private memory, the retelling exemplifies the making of a connection from one pattern to another: a potential translation in which narrative becomes parable and the once upon a time comes to stand for some renascent truth. This approach applies to all the incidents of everyday life: the phrase in the newspaper, the endearing or infuriating game of a toddler, the misunderstand-
ing at the office. Our species thinks in metaphors and learns through stories."
-Mary Catherine Bateson, Anthropologist Read more!

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Are you haunted?


1.  Are you haunted?  Does a strange quest, question, compulsion follow you?    

These cards emerge from an unrelenting inner compulsion.  Finally, after months (years) of ignoring, arguing, avoiding, I will finally give up and write.  I can give an hour in the morning to this strange pull.  My critic rages that this is crap.  Yes, ok, perhaps.  But I make space for this obsession—to record lessons learned in my own dark woods.  These cards are like hunks of bread I’ve torn and smashed together in my hand, and then tossed to the ground.  Can I understand my long strange trip?  Can I create a path of meaning, if not for others, at least for myself? 

What idea pursues you?  It lurks beneath ipads, tv, and tweets.  It sits like a Loch Ness in your own deep waters.  Will you sit quiet and watch your waters and learn what stirs within? 

Are you called to some strange quest?  Is the work too large?  How can you hope to finish it in one (not even one) lifetime? 

Still.  Isn’t it time to start? 

Give in to the idea that haunts you and watch your stress recede. 

Write, paint, dream.  Walk, play, watch.  Where, how can you serve?   

What is more moral:  following your true nature or doing what others expect?

Cheating, lying (to myself or others)  is not moral.  But following my heart?  If it will not hurt another, I must follow my own path to discover my true gifts. 

I WILL make mistakes (that is the only way to learn).  But I will find my way. 

Deep in your heart, you know what you are being call to do.

Do it.   

© 2011 Laura Lewis-Barr all rights reserved No more to read on this post. Even though Blogger says Read more!

Thursday, April 28, 2011

Another Quote to Cling To

You need only claim the events
of your life to make yourself yours.
When you truly possess all you
have been and done, which may
take some time, you are fierce
with reality.

Florida Scott Maxwell 
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